Telepathy and Emotion in Alien Society
 


Part 12: Telepathy and Alien Emotional Life

 

In a society based on telepathy and restricted emotional range, it might be difficult to experience what we would call "love." Without a sense of self-love that comes from a sense of individuality, the aliens might have a diminished capacity to have these feelings. They certainly have the ability to elicit feelings of love and affection in abductees through neural stimulation, and abductees often make the mistake of assuming that those feelings are reciprocal. Although a taller alien being might show a sense of friendship or even intimate that he "likes" someone, there is little evidence that he has any capacity to love in the human sense.

The aliens' inability to love also suggests that their sense of morality and conscience might be very different. This allows for their apparent lack of moral qualms when they abduct people and sometimes inflict serious physical and hidden mental damage on them. They might think they are doing it for good purposes but they have their concepts of what is good without regard to humans’. For them, the ends justify the means and the conscience does not seem to play an important role in their abduction program.

Rationality and logic are far more important in their society than emotion, empathy, and sympathy. Thus, the human “connection” that one expects in all human societies would be absent in alien society. When this connection is lost and the dominant group identifies the “other” as the enemy or the “lesser species,” it becomes easier for that group to subjugate or even eliminate the subordinate group. The history of genocide in the world amply displays the consequences of the objectification and demonization of the “other.” The aliens' activity in relation to the abduction and exploitation of humans could very well be an indication of this mode of thinking.


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All content © David M. Jacobs and International Center for Abduction Research except as noted.