Telepathy and Emotion in Alien Society
 


Part 7: Human-to-Human Telepathic Communication

 

Abductees can sometimes carry on conversations with other abductees whom they encounter on board a UFO. Human-to-human communication can either be by telepathy or by voice. When talking to another human, the abductees do not consciously chose telepathy or voice. They simply do one or the other. Why humans can communicate orally with one another is a mystery given that it is apparently very difficult in other abduction contexts. It is possible, and even likely, that they only think they are talking normally but they are actually communicating telepathically.

When humans converse with one another, their conversations typically often involve how they can escape from the UFO or what the aliens are going to do to them. Often one abductee tries to calm or reassure other abductees saying that the aliens will not hurt them and they will be leaving soon. In effect they do the aliens' work for them. Whether this is because of alien design or because it stems from human compassion remains to be seen. Although these types of conversation seem reasonable on the surface, in fact they are somewhat frustrating for the researcher. Only rarely will the abductees exchange their names and addresses. Even though they have been abducted many times before, they seem unaware that they will most likely forget the experience directly afterwards and it does not occur to them that it might be important to locate the person whom they saw on board for verification of their experience. Much of this has to do with the aliens’ abilities to neurologically alter the mechanisms of memory and consciousness that is beyond the scope of this paper.7

 

 

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7. For a discussion of the neurological effects on memory, see David M. Jacobs, The Threat, New York: Simon & Schuster, 1998.


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